The Ahuwhenua Trophy acknowledges and celebrates business excellence in New Zealand's important pastoral and horticultural sectors. This competition is held annually, alternating each year between dairy and sheep & beef, and now also horticulture. The upcoming 2020 competition is for Māori horticulturalists.



Ahuwhenua Trophy 2020 Key Dates

Friday 21 February - Parliamentary Announcement of Finalists

Friday 20 November 2020 - Awards Dinner - Rotorua Energy Events Centre


Talking about us

'It's an amazing feeling but I didn't expect it' - Maatutaera Tipoki Akonga Te Ao Māori News - 10 May 2020

Ahuwhenua Young Māori Grower Award 2020 finalists announced The Country The Country - 20 April 2020

Maatutaera Tipoki Akonga has been announced as a finalist in the Ahuwhenua Young Māori Grower Award 2020 The Hastings 26-year-old who's responsible for 80 hectares of apple trees HAWKE'S BAY TODAY - 20 April 2020

Three top performing Bay of Plenty orchards are finalists in the inaugural Ahuwhenua Trophy competition to honour excellence in Maori horticulture. Trophy this year honouring Maori horticulture Coast&Country News - 26 March 2020

One of our current 2020 Ahuwhenua Trophy Finalists, Ngai Tukairangi Trust are in the news coming out in support of the horticulture industry, offering opportunities to those with transferable skills, and keeping the health and safety of staff and employees at the forefront.
Kiwifruit industry providing employment for laid off kaimahi Te Ao Māori News - 30 March 2020

Jack Raharuhi, our 2016 Ahuwhenua Young Maori Farmer winner has won another prestigious award, the 2020 Zanda McDonald - we are very proud of him!
Kiwi Jack Raharuhi takes the crown in top Australasian agri-business award Zanda McDonald Award - 25 March 2020

Country Calendar Episode 9 - Motu Magic about Eugene and Pania Kings, one the 2019 Finalists



Latest photos

2020 Ahuwhenua Trophy Launch

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Latest video

2019 Award Dinner

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Latest Newsletter

Field Days

New date for Ngai Tukairangi Trust field day - download Field Day Flyer

News

Ahuwhenua Young Māori Grower Award 2020 finalists announced

The finalists in the Ahuwhenua Young Māori Grower Award 2020 have been announced. They are:

 

Brandon Darny Paora Ngamoki Cross, Ngai Tukairangi, Ngai Te Rangi, Te Whanau-a-Apanui, Ngati Porou. Brandon, 24, works as trainee Orchard Manager for the large kiwifruit orchard management and post-harvest company Seeka.

Maatutaera Tipoki Akonga, Ngai Tahu, Ngati Porou, Ngati Kahungungu. Maatutaera, 26, works as a Senior Leading Hand at Llewellyn Horticulture based in the Hastings area.

Finnisha Nicola Letitia Tuhiwai, Ngati Te Rino raua ko Te Parawhau nga hapu, ko Ngapuhi te iwi. Finnisha, 25, works as a Packhouse Manager for Maungatapere Berries located west of Whangarei in a rural town ship called Maungatapere.

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The Hineora Orchard / Te Kaha 15B Ahu Whenua Trust 

The Hineora Orchard / Te Kaha 15B Ahu Whenua Trust 

Te Kaha 15B is a Māori freehold land block located in the Eastern Bay of Plenty township of Te Kaha, 65km east of Ōpōtiki. The whenua falls within the tribal rohe of Te Whānau-a-Apanui, and more specifically, is associated with Te Whānau a Te Ehutu hapū.

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Otama Marere (Paengaroa North A5) Block

Otama Marere (Paengaroa North A5) Block

Otama Marere (Paengaroa North A5) Block in Paengaroa near the Bay of Plenty town of Te Puke has gone through a remarkable transition. The land was originally leased to the local golf club on a 60 year lease at two shillings and six pence per acre. When the lease on the 45.01 hectare block expired in the 1980s, Otama Marere took back the land and converted the golf course into an orchard.

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Ngai Tukairangi Trust

Ngai Tukairangi Trust

Ngai Tukairangi Trust is very large kiwifruit operation with one of its orchards, based at Matapihi, just a few kilometres from the centre of Tauranga city. Their land is on a peninsular and was originally used for dairy farming. Forty years ago, a number of family members who owned the dairy farms feared that the land would become incorporated into urban development. They decided that they had a better chance of holding onto it by converting to kiwifruit.

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